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ISIPP News - 2005 Archives

ISIPP ANNOUNCES THAT NEW VERSION OF SPAM ASSASSIN INCLUDES SUPPORT FOR ISIPP’S EMAIL SENDERS ACCREDITATION SERVICE

Premier Spam Filter Includes Support for ISIPP’s IADB Service

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - September 15, 2005 - The Institute for Spam and Internet Public Policy (ISIPP) said today that the newest version of SpamAssassin, version 3.1.0, includes support for ISIPP’s Email Sender Accreditation Service.

ISIPP’s Email Sender Accreditation Service, also known as the “IADB”, for ISIPP Accreditation Database, allows ISIPP’s accredited email senders to provide information about their email sending practices and policies in real time to email receivers, such as ISPs, spam filters, and enterprise mail servers. This allows email receivers to know that they can safely accept and deliver the email, because they can tell in real time that it is legitimate, wanted mail, and not spam. In the case of a spam filter such as SpamAssassin, the ISIPP information can offset or even override a negative score which the email might otherwise receive due to its containing the wrong words, or being in the wrong format.

“We’re extremely pleased to have support for our IADB Email Senders Accreditation Program built into the newest version of SpamAssassin,” said Anne Mitchell, CEO and President of ISIPP. “SpamAssassin is a fantastic product, used by ISPs large and small, as well as innumerable enterprise mail servers around the world. End users expecting email from senders accredited with us will now find fewer false positives, with less wanted email being accidentally blocked as “spam”, and of course our email senders benefit from that as well.”

Email senders who are currently accredited through ISIPP include Innovyx, eDialog, ExactTarget, CNet, MarketingSherpa, and Date.com.

“SpamAssassin is what I use - and what I recommend to others for industrial strength, server-level spam protection,” said Randy Cassingham, Publisher of ThisIsTrue.com and StellaAwards.com, both ISIPP accredited senders. “The biggest complaint I get from my readers, though, is that they don’t get the newsletters they’ve asked for (or in some cases paid for!) SpamAssassin’s action will help people get the e-mail they want, without having to pay the price of getting junk they don’t want. Bravo!”

SpamAssassin is an open source spam filter program, provided at no charge at SpamAssassin.org

or more information about the ISIPP Email Senders Accreditation Program see http://www.isipp.com/ or send email to iadb at isipp.com.


ISIPP ANNOUNCES ‘AUCTION AID’, CELEBRITY AUCTIONS FOR HURRICANE KATRINA RELIEF - BID ON GUY KAWASAKI, SIR HAROLD EVANS, BELA FLECK!

A Name You Can Trust Brings You a Hurricane Katrina Relief Website You Can Trust with Names You Know

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - September 14, 2005 - The Institute for Spam and Internet Public Policy (ISIPP) is pleased to announce their participation in a new service, Auction Aid.

Through Auction Aid, celebrities such as Guy Kawasaki, Warren Farrell, Sir Harold Evans, Bela Fleck, and Anne Fadiman are offering either their time, or their books and music personally autographed by them, with all proceeds going to the American Red Cross’ Hurricane Katrina Relief Fund.

“We are very pleased to offer this service,” said Anne Mitchell, President and CEO of ISIPP, “and the support by both the celebrities and the community has been fantastic.”

Items currently being auctioned to benefit the victims of Hurricane Katrina include:

o A one-half hour meeting or telephone call with marketing and venture capital legend Guy Kawasaki

o A one-half hour telephone call with author and relationship and corporate communications expert Warren Farrell

o Autographed editions of “They Made America” and “The American Century” by Sir Harold Evans

o Autographed CDs by jazz banjo virtuoso Bela Fleck

o A first edition of “The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down” by Anne Fadiman, personally inscribed by the author for the winning bidder

Mitchell, who also publishes the widely-read Aunty Spam website, conceived of Auction Aid while trying to figure out a way to encourage people to donate to Hurricane Katrina relief through a site which they could trust. Aunty Spam also offered readers free gifts if they donated to the Red Cross.

“Here I was covering the news of all the Hurricane Katrina scam sites, but not offering an alternative. Auction Aid was a natural,” explained Mitchell.

“We’re seeing an enormous number of Hurricane Katrina scams,” explained Audri G. Lanford, Ph.D., Co-Director of the highly-regarded ScamBusters.org (http://www.scambusters.org). “For example, there are now over 4,000 sites claiming to offer help to Katrina victims, and the FBI believes up to 60% are likely bogus! We’re delighted that a group as highly respected as ISIPP is behind an effort like Auction Aid — that way people can feel confident participating in these auctions to raise much-needed financial support for the victims.”

All of the auctions on Auction Aid are through eBay, with 100% of the winning bid being paid directly to the Red Cross.

Auction Aid’s celebrity auctions are online at http://www.AuctionAid.org

People wishing to donate items for auction on Auction Aid should contact support@isipp.com


ISIPP UNVEILS NEW COMPANION EMAILSENDERS ACCREDITATION PROGRAM

New Program Offered for Email Senders Transactional and Corporate Email

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - August 29, 2005 - The Institute for Spam and Internet Public Policy (ISIPP) has announced a new companion program to its popular Email Senders Accreditation program. The new program, called the Email Senders Accreditation Companion Program, is geared especially for commercial email senders who send their marketing or advertising campaigns or other bulk mailings out through an Email Service Provider (ESP), but who would also like to have their transactional email and corporate communications accredited.

ISIPP’s Email Senders Accreditation Program, which also goes by the nickname “IADB” for the ‘ISIPP Accreditation Database’, provides accredited senders’ information to ISPs, spam filters, and other email receivers, who use the information to help them make email processing and delivery decisions. Email senders who are accredited through ISIPP enjoy some of the highest email delivery rates available, in a time when legitimate commercial email is increasingly being erroneously filtered as ’spam’.

“What we have found is that many email senders who are already using one of our accredited email service providers for their direct mail campaigns also want to be able to have their transactional email and regular day-to-day email communications accredited, as even these messages are not always making it into the inbox. And these are the messages that are the most likely to be mission-critical, such as messages containing confirmations, instructions or requests which are on a deadline,” explained Anne Mitchell, President and CEO of ISIPP.

“The Companion Program was developed at the request of email senders who wanted become accredited with ISIPP and have the same benefits of accreditation for their main email communications as they are already enjoying for their bulk mailings through their ISIPP-accredited ESPs,” added Mitchell. “We’ve had a very enthusiastic response to the program, and customers who now have their transactional and corporate email accredited with us include MarketingSherpa and Lockergnome.”

The Companion Program is open to any email sender who uses the services of any of ISIPP’s accredited ESPs, which include ExactTarget, e-Dialog, Innovyx, ConstantContact, Informz, and Aweber. Email senders who don’t use one of these email service providers, or who service their own mass mailings in-house, are also encouraged to contact ISIPP.

“Not everyone can take advantage of the Companion Program, but they may well qualify for our primary Email Senders Accreditation Program,” explained Mitchell. “We have lots of email senders accredited through us who do their own mailings, including CNet, Date.com, and IndieWire.”

“With our Email Senders Accreditation Program’s affordable pricing, month-to-month service with no time commitment, and money-back guarantee, we truly offer something for everyone, from the mom and pop newsletter all the way up to the largest email senders,” she added.


UTAH OPENS CHILD EMAIL ADDRESS REGISTRY FOR BUSINESS, ALL COMMERCIAL EMAILERS MUST COMPLY BY AUGUST 15th

“Both Michigan and Utah Registries Now in Full Swing, Noncompliant Commercial Emailers at Risk,” warns ISIPP

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - July 18, 2005 - The Institute for Spam and Internet Public Policy (ISIPP) is warning that all commercial email senders are now required to either comply with the child protection email address registries and registry laws of both Michigan and Utah, or risk penalties which can include prison and fines running to the thousands of dollars.

“It doesn’t matter what you think of these new laws,” explained Anne P. Mitchell, President and CEO of the Institute and a Professor of Internet Law at Lincoln Law School of San Jose, “they are both in effect right now. Like them or not, they are real, they are out there, and they’ll get you. Michigan’s law went into effect two weeks ago, and Utah’s became effective on July 15th. Both registries are now fully operational and accepting email addresses, and if you send unpermitted email to an address on either registry, you’ll get nailed.”

“Michigan is going to start enforcing their law against email senders in less than two weeks,” Mitchell emphasized.

The new Michigan and Utah “Child Protection Registry” laws were both passed last year, but under the terms of the laws each state had a year to put the process in place and get the registries up and running. Individuals may place on the registries any email address “to which a minor may have access”. Schools and other organizations which provide services to children may also register entire Internet domains. Both laws are controversial, and Mitchell says that there is a lot of misinformation swirling around the two laws.

“We’re seeing three big areas of misconception,” said Mitchell. “First, email senders think that the laws don’t apply to them because they don’t send spam. But these laws are not at all about spam, they are about content which is unpermitted for minors, even if the email is requested. Even if the email is paid for!”

“We’re seeing three big areas of misconception,” said Mitchell. “First, email senders think that the laws don’t apply to them because they don’t send spam. But these laws are not at all about spam, they are about content which is unpermitted for minors, even if the email is requested. Even if the email is paid for!”

“We’re seeing three big areas of misconception,” said Mitchell. “First, email senders think that the laws don’t apply to them because they don’t send spam. But these laws are not at all about spam, they are about content which is unpermitted for minors, even if the email is requested. Even if the email is paid for!”

Once an email address is on one of the registries, commercial emailers are prohibited from sending it anything containing advertising, or even just linking to advertising, for a product or service that a minor is otherwise legally prohibited from accessing, such as alcohol, tobacco, gambling, prescription drugs, or adult-rated material. In order to ensure that they don’t send unpermitted material to any email address on one of the registries, email senders are required to match their mailing lists against the registries on a monthly basis, for which they must pay both Michigan and Utah a per-email-address fee.

In addition to state attorneys general, individual citizens and ISPs may both bring lawsuits against email senders whom they believe to have violated either law.

“We can’t emphasize enough how seriously commercial email senders should take these laws,” added Mitchell. “At the very least, senders need to make sure that their choice as to whether to comply or not is an informed, educated decision. The penalties for non-compliance with these laws can be very serious.”

The Institute conducted a teleseminar dealing with the new child protection registry laws last week, in an effort to help email marketers and other commercial email senders understand what they need to do in order to avoid running afoul of the new laws. According to ISIPP the seminar was very well attended, and participants had a lot of questions about the new laws.

An audio recording and written transcript of the seminar, along with seminar materials, is available at the ISIPP website at http://www.isipp.com.

ISIPP has also updated their Email Sender Accreditation program (the IADB) so that senders who choose to do so can identify themselves as complying with the new Michigan and Utah laws. ISIPP’s IADB allows receiving email systems to check on an email sender’s credentials in real time including, now, whether they are complying with the new Child Protection Registry laws. Dozens of ISPs and spam filters, representing more than 400million inboxes, use the IADB’s data to help make email processing and delivery decisions.

Email senders interested in ordering the audio and written transcript of ISIPP’s July 7th teleseminar on “Child Protection Email Address Registry Compliance” can do so at http://www.isipp.com.

Information about ISIPP’s IADB Email Senders Accreditation Program, which includes Child Protection Registry compliance notification, is available at http://www.isipp.com/iadb.php.

The Utah Child Protection Registry is at https://www.utahkidsregistry.com.

The Michigan Child Protection Registry is at https://www.protectmichild.com.


AS JULY 1st LOOMS, ISIPP OFFERS TELESEMINAR TO HELP EMAIL SENDERS COMPLY WITH NEW CHILD PROTECTION EMAIL ADDRESS REGISTRY LAWS

“Email Senders Need to Realize That These New Laws Apply to All Commercial Email Senders, and All Commercial Email, Solicited and Otherwise”

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - June 29, 2005
- The Institute for Spam and Internet Public Policy (ISIPP) is offering a teleseminar to help email senders, and email marketers and email service providers in particular, understand what they need to do in order to comply with the new child protection email address registry laws which go into effect on Friday, July 1.

“Email senders are starting to realize that these new laws take affect on Friday,” explained Anne P. Mitchell, President and CEO of the Institute and a Professor of Internet Law at Lincoln Law School of San Jose, “but many of them don’t believe that the laws apply to them, and none of them understand what they need to do in order to comply. It’s mass confusion out there.”

The “Child Protection Registry” laws go into affect on Friday, July 1st, and apply to all senders of commercial email, whether solicited or not, said Mitchell. And while the registries are in Michigan and Utah, they apply to any sender inside the United States or even who just has a presence in the United States, she explained. Starting on Friday, individuals may place on the registries any email address “to which a minor may have access”. Organizations which primarily provide services for children, such as schools, may also register entire Internet domains. Once an email address is on the registry, commercial emailers are prohibited from sending it anything containing advertising, or even just linking to advertising, for a product or service that a minor is otherwise legally prohibited from accessing, such as alcohol, tobacco, gambling, prescription drugs, or adult-rated material.

The new laws apply to any email which may market products or services which are forbidden for children, explained Senator Mike Bishop, sponsor of the Michigan legislation. “While no law will conclusively solve the problem of spam or replace parents as the primary resource for teaching children right from wrong, Michigan’s Child Protection Registry helps extend to the ‘digital world’ the same level of protection and comfort afforded to children and parents in the real world,” Bishop said. “Any vendor who markets a product, be it tobacco, alcohol, pornography or any other item that a minor cannot legally purchase, is now required by law to check their email lists against the registry.”

Penalties for sending such email to an email address on the registry include “imprisonment for not more than 3 years or a fine of not more than $30,000.00, or both.” Internet service providers and individuals are empowered to sue under the new laws. To avoid incurring such penalties, email senders must match their mailing lists against the registries on a monthly basis.

In order to help email senders to understand the new laws and what they must do, ISIPP is offering a teleseminar on the new laws on Thursday, July 7th. Registration is limited and is on a first-come first-served basis.

In addition to offering the teleseminar, ISIPP’s IADB Email Sender Accreditation Service is the only accreditation, or “reputation”, service for email senders which identifies those email senders that are complying with the new Michigan and Utah laws. ISIPP’s IADB allows receiving email systems to check on an email sender’s credentials in real time including, now, whether they are complying with the new Child Protection Registry laws.

Email senders interested in ISIPP’s July 7th teleseminar on “Child Protection Email Address Registry Compliance” can register at http://www.isipp.com/events.php

Information about ISIPP’s IADB Email Senders Accreditation Program, which includes Child Protection Registry compliance notification, is available at http://www.isipp.com/iadb.php


NEW JULY 1st CHILD EMAIL ADDRESS REGISTRY LAWS A BIG SURPRISE AFFECTING ALL EMAILERS, WARNS INSTITUTE FOR SPAM AND INTERNET PUBLIC POLICY

“Jail Time, Large Penalties, and Private Actions Facing All Commercial Emailers Who Fail to Comply,” advises ISIPP

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - June 27, 2005
- The Institute for Spam and Internet Public Policy (ISIPP) is warning today that two laws enacted last year are about to go into effect, and will affect all commercial emailers in the United States and beyond.

“It’s incredible,” observed Anne P. Mitchell, President and CEO of the Intitute and a Professor of Internet Law at Lincoln Law School of San Jose, “these laws go into practical effect next week, and will affect nearly every commercial emailer out there, and nobody seems to know about it!”

The laws to which Mitchell refers are the new Michigan and Utah “Child Protection Registry” laws. Under the laws both states must, no later than July 1st, create and operate email address registries similar to currently-existing “do not call” lists. Individuals may place on the registries any email address “to which a minor may have access”. Schools and other child-focused organizations may also register entire Internet domains.

Once an email address is on the registry, commercial emailers are prohibited from sending it anything containing advertising, or even just linking to advertising, for a product or service that a minor is otherwise legally prohibited from accessing, such as alcohol, tobacco, gambling, prescription drugs, or adult-rated material. This is the case even if the mailing was requested. In order to ensure that they don’t send unpermitted material to any email address on the registry, email senders are required to match their mailing lists against the registries on a monthly basis, for which they must pay both Michigan and Utah a per-email-address fee. Both laws were passed and enacted in 2004, and are mandated to take effect no later than July 1, 2005.

“The laws are very clear about this,” explained Mitchell. “The Michigan law says ‘The registry shall be fully operational not later than July 1, 2005′. These registries are going into affect next week, and absolutely nobody realizes it. We’ve talked with several top tier email marketing firms, and email service providers, and they were all just stunned to learn that they need to start scrubbing their mailing lists against these registries next month or face criminal sanctions!”

Failure to comply with the new laws can lead to state-imposed penalties including “imprisonment for not more than 3 years or a fine of not more than $30,000.00, or both,” and Internet service providers and individuals may also sue under the new laws.

Said Tom Kulzer, CEO of AWeber Communications, a leading commercial email auto-responder service, “Businesses should recognize that, right or wrong, these laws affect both solicited and unsolicited email.”

ISIPP is offering an “information and compliance” teleseminar dealing with the new child protection registry laws on Thursday, July 7th, in an effort to help email marketers and other commercial email senders understand what they need to do in order to avoid running afoul of the new laws.

“The emailers we’ve talked with are very worried about this, and rightly so,” observed Mitchell. “That’s why we’re offering the teleseminar next week, to explain these new laws and what one has to do, and not do, to be in compliance.”

In addition to offering the teleseminar, ISIPP’s IADB Email Sender Accreditation Service is the only accreditation, or “reputation”, service for email senders which identifies those email senders that are complying with the new Michigan and Utah laws. ISIPP’s IADB allows receiving email systems to check on an email sender’s credentials in real time including, now, whether they are complying with the new Child Protection Registry laws.

The Michigan law was sponsored by Senator Mike Bishop, whose office confirmed to ISIPP that the mandates of the law are indeed going forward. “While no law will conclusively solve the problem of spam or replace parents as the primary resource for teaching children right from wrong, Michigan’s Child Protection Registry will help make navigating the ever changing on-line world a little less worrisome for parents and a little bit safer for children,” Bishop said. “I applaud all those who are helping us take this crucial first step of extending to the ‘digital world’ the same level of protection and comfort afforded to children and parents in the real world.”

“It’s immaterial whether one agrees with these new laws or not,” advises Mitchell, who teaches Internet Law to upper-division law students at Lincoln. “Unless and until these laws are ruled invalid by a court, an emailer has only two choices to avoid getting into legal trouble: scrub their mailing lists against these registries once a month, or be sure that every single piece of email they send contains not even a hint of a link which someone could follow and find any of these forbidden products or services.”

“It doesn’t matter that these laws are coming out of left field for most emailers, or whether or not they are fair or make sense. They’re here, compliance is required, and failure to comply can result in criminal and civil penalties,” Mitchell added.

Email senders interested in ISIPP’s July 7th teleseminar on “Child Protection Email Address Registry Compliance” can register at http://www.isipp.com/events.php

Information about ISIPP’s IADB Email Senders Accreditation Program, which includes Child Protection Registry compliance notification, is available at http://www.isipp.com/iadb.php


INSTITUTE FOR SPAM AND INTERNET PUBLIC POLICY ADVISES COMPANIES TO AVOID LEGAL TROUBLE WITH STRONG EMAIL HANDLING POLICIES

“Don’t Become the Next Morgan Stanley” Advises ISIPP in Wake of $1.45 Billion Email Mismanagement Judgement

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - May 23, 2005 - The Institute for Spam and Internet Public Policy (ISIPP) is advising companies to take the $1.45billion email mismanagement judgement recently announced against Morgan Stanley as a wake-up call.

“For the most part, organizations are very blithe about how they process, retain, and delete email both sent and received by their organization,” said Anne P. Mitchell, Esq., President and CEO of the Institute, and a Professor of Law. “In fact, most companies have no email handling and retention policies at all. This is a big mistake, as email is usually one of the first things demanded during a lawsuit. It was exactly this mismanagement of email which lead to the enormous legal judgement against Morgan Stanley this past week.”

Last week’s judgement against Morgan Stanley involved the financial company’s failure to retain and produce email demanded during a lawsuit by billionaire Ronald Perelman, in which Perelman accused Morgan Stanley of deceiving him about a business deal.

“While businesses must, and usually do, have written document retention policies, they often fail to have similar policies relating to email. Yet a great deal of information is both sent and received in email, and copies of email are almost always demanded during the discovery phase of a lawsuit. A court is not going to take kindly to a defendant saying “Oops, it was deleted,” explained Mitchell, who said that she knows of several companies which have met similar legal fates where the failure to retain email or other electronic communications has been equated by the court with destruction of evidence.

“Just as importantly,” said Mitchell, who teaches Internet Law at Lincoln Law School of San Jose, “companies need to make sure that they have a clear policy in place about the scope of what their employees may discuss electronically during the course of their employment, not just in email, but in Internet forums such as chat rooms, instant messengers, and Usenet. Each piece of email, every little public remark, is a potential smoking gun, just waiting to indict the company from which the message originated.”

ISIPP, which is best known for its accreditation services for email senders and marketers, its anti-spam technology for email receivers, and its Spam and the Law conferences, also advises companies on email retention and handling, and Internet public statement policies.

Added Mitchell, who is on the advisory boards of Kinar Secure Email, Relemail Email Privacy Certification, and the Virus Bulletin, “The time to put such a policy in place was yesterday, and certainly today - not once once the lawsuit happens. By that time it is too late.”


CLOUDMARK, GO DADDY SIGN ON AS SPONSORS OF UPCOMING “SPAM AND THE LAW” CONFERENCE

Email Marketers, Spam Filters, and ISPs Among Those to Gather on Friday

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - January 25, 2005 - The Institute for Spam and Internet Public Policy (ISIPP) announced today the addition of two new sponsors for their 2nd Annual “Spam and the Law” conference, which is being held at the Westin Hotel at San Francisco airport on Friday, January 28, 2005.

“We are thrilled to have both Cloudmark and Go Daddy join us as sponsors this year,” said Anne P. Mitchell, Esq., President of the Institute. “The caliber of our sponsors and speakers just continues to amaze me, and our attendees couldn’t hope for a better set of experts to bring them up-to-date.”

Approximately one hundred industry professionals will be meeting in San Francisco to attend the day-long single-track conference, where they will learn about the current state of the law as it relates to both sending and receiving email, as well as about trends and methods for dealing with spam and email deliverability.

“We have a really wonderful group of speakers this year,” said Mitchell. “There is something for everyone, whether email marketer, ISP, spam filter, or industry attorney. In fact, we have speakers from each of those groups.”

This year’s conference has attracted such noted speakers as Danny Goodman - author of “Spam Wars”, FTC Attorney Lisa Rosenthal, Dr. Phyllis Schneck - VP of Strategic Development for Ciphertrust, Tom Kulzer of Aweber, Microsoft Internet Safety Enforcement Attorney Aaron Kornblum, Joe Tyler - President of Informz Email Marketing Solutions, and California Deputy Attorney General Ian Sweedler.

“GoDaddy.com is aggressive and relentless in combating spam through our specific business practices, as well as participating in industry-wide initiatives,” said Ben Butler, Network Abuse Manager for Internet domain registrar GoDaddy.com. “We’rere proud to sponsor the second annual Spam and the Law conference and warmly welcome all presenters and participants. The information, ideas and initiatives this conference provides will surely help all of us to better focus our efforts on combating the scourge of spam.”

“Enforcement is a critical component of any approach to effectively contain spam,” said conference speaker Aaron Kornblum, Microsoft’s Internet Safety Enforcement Attorney. “Enforcement complements technological solutions, such as enhancements to spam filters and email authentication technologies like Sender ID, strong and effective legislation, industry cooperation and global consumer education.”

Added conference sponsor and speaker Tom Kulzer, of Aweber, “By sponsoring ISIPP’s “Spam and the Law” conference AWeber hopes to help educate and spread the usage of responsible opt-in email practices by small businesses.”

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