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Whither goest Mailchimp? Often an email company being acquired leads to abuse handling and opt-in standards declining, and so to an associated decline in reputation and deliverability. It took Mailchimp 20 years to build up the good reputation that they have in the email receiving community; it can take them, or Intuit, or both, fewer than six months to destroy it.
ray tomlinson inventor of email qwertyuiop
Today we are celebrating both the dawn of networked email, and the person who sent the first email, Ray Tomlinson. In October, 1971, Ray sent the very first networked email. To be sure, the computer to which he sent it was barely 3 feet away from the computer from which he sent it, and yes, he had sent it to himself, but nonetheless, it was groundbreaking. Prior to that some computers had a rudimentary 'email' messaging system through which one person could leave a 'mail' message for another person, but only on the same computer (sort of like a local dropbox). Sending one email to another computer was a Very Big Deal. It was also Ray who decided that there should be the "@" between the username and the domain (web address) of the email, and the rest, as they say, is history.
We've touched on this briefly before, but I think that it's time to make it crystal clear: ISPs do not have to accept and deliver email - any email - your email - even if it isn't spam.
A New York court yesterday affirmed that New York can charge sales tax on sales made through affiliates who are based in New York state. Known as "The Amazon Tax", and indeed the primary plaintiff in the case was Amazon, the rule says that so long as the affiliate is located in New York, and the company for whom the sales are generated has sales of at least $10,000 attributable to affiliates in New York, then the company must pay sales tax to the state of New York.
A fascinating, and a bit shocking, study was released today, rating how well online commerce sites do when it comes to responding to prospect and customer email queries. Not very, it turns out.
We recently had one of our email accreditation customers ask us whether we would contact all of the blacklists listed at on a particular site on their behalf, because the site listed their IP address' reputation with these blacklists as "neutral".
Every so often we run into a sender who has a sense of entitlement - or even righteous indignation - about how an ISP should, must - even has to - accept their email. Whether because it's "requested" or opt-in or because it "complies with CAN-SPAM", the sender gets all in our face about how a given ISP has a responsiblity and duty to accept their email. Sometimes they even rant that it's required by {CAN-SPAM| tort law | the 1st Amendment | insert your favourite rant here}. Except, that's completely wrong.
Many of our customers come to us concerned about one thing above all else: whitelisting. And, you can find email service providers who tout right on their front page "We are whitelisted with many major ISPs." Indeed, getting whitelisted used to be the holy grail of email delivery. Did you catch that? Used to be.
We recently had a customer muse to us "I think there's got to be a phone number at the ISP that we could call, so we can ask them to explain the reason we are being sent to the junk folder." As most of you who read this probably know, well, there isn't such a phone number. But why not?
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